Lending a Hand to our Brothers and Sisters in Mexico 🤝

A portion of proceeds from each online sale will go directly to our friends in Mexico, who are there on the ground to support the affected Mayan communities in 7 de Octubre and Francisco I. Madero in Chiapas. Municipal governments are withholding proceeds so we are skipping bureaucracy and donating to local partners...best way is the direct way. We will continue to share photos and information of the relief efforts as they are underway. 

Somos unidos con Mexico... cada venta va a ayudar las comunidades en Chiapas, 7 de Octubre y Francisco I. Madero. Ninguna burocracia, manera directa. Vamos a compartir informaciĂłn sobre sus donaciones...permanezcan atentos para recibir más detalles.

Meet the families from Mexico that our joint donation will support:

"The night of the earthquake, my husband and I were sleeping. When the house started to shake, my son had to carry my husband out of our bed. About a year ago, he fell off his donkey and since then he hasn’t been able to walk, interact, or talk. We’ve taken him to specialists in Tapachula and they weren’t able to tell us what was wrong, they believe he injured a nerve. They gave him two months to live, it has now been over a year. One of my kids is in middle school, the other one had to drop out of high school because I can’t take care of my husband- he helps me wash him, take him to the bathroom. He also helps us earn money because no one else in the family works. We lost our kitchen the night of the earthquake, I don’t know how we will fix it because we do not have money. Every time the house shakes, I worry for my husband, I cannot take him out of the house by myself." - Astrid

"The night of the earthquake, my husband and I were sleeping. When the house started to shake, my son had to carry my husband out of our bed. About a year ago, he fell off his donkey and since then he hasn’t been able to walk, interact, or talk. We’ve taken him to specialists in Tapachula and they weren’t able to tell us what was wrong, they believe he injured a nerve. They gave him two months to live, it has now been over a year.

One of my kids is in middle school, the other one had to drop out of high school because I can’t take care of my husband- he helps me wash him, take him to the bathroom. He also helps us earn money because no one else in the family works. We lost our kitchen the night of the earthquake, I don’t know how we will fix it because we do not have money.

Every time the house shakes, I worry for my husband, I cannot take him out of the house by myself." - Astrid

Photo: Astrid

Photo: Astrid

Photo: Astrid

Photo: Astrid

"At first glance, it may seem like these sisters have four walls and a roof. However, if you look closer, there are three signs that things aren’t going well for two girls. The CT on the door was spray-painted by the military when they assessed the house; it means the house is a total loss and they should not be living there, however they do not have any other options. The second clue that things aren’t going well is the black ribbon on the door frame. This means that there recently was a death in the family, their mother died from tuberculosis a month before the earthquake, the younger girl’s father died eight months ago. And lastly, the large crack on the left corner of their house shows that there is major structural damage and they definitely should not be living there. Anita and Maria are half sisters. Before their mother’s death, Maria was living in Jaltenango, working as a salesperson, she did not know Anita. When their mother died, Maria decided that she would move back to her hometown to take care of her sister. They are slowly getting to know each other but Maria can no longer work and does not have the money to fulfill their basic needs, however her younger sister does not have any other family members who will take care of her. As they create a relationship, they are forced to sleep outside of their house because they are afraid the aftershocks will destroy the roof they have. Getting to know your half sister isn’t easy under normal circumstances, to say that creating a relationship with her after your mother died and an earthquake destroyed your home is no simple task would be an understatement." - Astrid

"At first glance, it may seem like these sisters have four walls and a roof. However, if you look closer, there are three signs that things aren’t going well for two girls. The CT on the door was spray-painted by the military when they assessed the house; it means the house is a total loss and they should not be living there, however they do not have any other options. The second clue that things aren’t going well is the black ribbon on the door frame. This means that there recently was a death in the family, their mother died from tuberculosis a month before the earthquake, the younger girl’s father died eight months ago. And lastly, the large crack on the left corner of their house shows that there is major structural damage and they definitely should not be living there.

Anita and Maria are half sisters. Before their mother’s death, Maria was living in Jaltenango, working as a salesperson, she did not know Anita. When their mother died, Maria decided that she would move back to her hometown to take care of her sister. They are slowly getting to know each other but Maria can no longer work and does not have the money to fulfill their basic needs, however her younger sister does not have any other family members who will take care of her.

As they create a relationship, they are forced to sleep outside of their house because they are afraid the aftershocks will destroy the roof they have. Getting to know your half sister isn’t easy under normal circumstances, to say that creating a relationship with her after your mother died and an earthquake destroyed your home is no simple task would be an understatement." - Astrid